August 1, 2021

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The World Stock Markets Tips & Targets, News, Views & Updates

In Pics | Shocking images of plastic pollution around the world showcased at UN exhibition

The images show how the indiscriminate use of plastic waste is impacting daily lives and surroundings. Let’s take a look at some of those insane pictures from around the globe.

For decades we have relied on plastics to keep us safe, insulate our homes and make sure our food stays fresh. From cell phones to car parts, PPE to syringes, the use of plastic has made our lives easier. But when does plastic’s life come to an end? (Image: Muntaka Chasant (Ghana) via UN)

For decades we have relied on plastic products to keep us safe, insulate our homes and make sure our food stays fresh. From cell phones to car parts, PPE to syringes, the use of plastic has made our lives easier. But when does plastic’s life come to an end? (Image: Muntaka Chasant (Ghana) via UN.org)

Plastic waste can take anywhere from 20 to 500 years to decompose, and even then, it never fully disappears; it just gets smaller and smaller. 8.3 billion tonnes is the total amount of plastic ever made, half of which has been produced in the last 13 years. This local beach in Java, Indonesia, has become an illegal dumpsite for plastic waste. One of the residents can be seen burning the plastic, so it doesn’t enter her house at high tide. (Image: Vincent Kneefel (The Netherlands) via UN)

Plastic waste can take anywhere from 20 to 500 years to decompose, and even then, it never fully disappears; it just gets smaller and smaller. 8.3 billion tonnes is the total amount of plastic ever made, half of which has been produced in the last 13 years. The local beach in Java, Indonesia, showed in the picture, has become an illegal dumpsite for plastic waste. One of the residents can be seen burning the plastic, so it doesn’t enter her house at high tide. (Image: Vincent Kneefel (The Netherlands) via UN.org)

Microplastics in particular have been found in every corner of the globe, from the peak of Mount Everest to the trough of the Mariana Trench. UN exhibition showcased images depicting how the indiscriminate use of plastic waste is impacting their daily lives and surroundings. Let’s take a look at some of those insane pictures of plastic pollution from around the globe. (Image: Shannon Switzer Swanson (USA) via UN)

Microplastics in particular have been found in every corner of the globe, from the peak of Mount Everest to the trough of the Mariana Trench. The UN exhibition showcased images depicting how the indiscriminate use of plastic waste is impacting our daily lives and surroundings. (Image: Shannon Switzer Swanson (USA) via UN.org)

A filter-feeding manta ray attempts to eat amidst the plastic in Bali's Nusa Penida. Recent research has shown that these manta rays ingest as much as 137 pieces of plastic an hour, which exposes their population to unknown long-term risks. (Image: Vincent Kneefel (The Netherlands) via UN)

A filter-feeding manta ray attempts to eat amidst the plastic in Bali’s Nusa Penida. Recent research has shown that these manta rays ingest as much as 137 pieces of plastic an hour, which exposes their population to unknown long-term risks. (Image: Vincent Kneefel (The Netherlands) via UN.org)

A youngster takes a swim in a river polluted with plastic and other waste in Bocaue, Philippines (Image: Jophel Botero Ybiosa (Philippines) via UN)

A youngster takes a swim in a river polluted with plastic and other waste in Bocaue, the Philippines (Image: Jophel Botero Ybiosa (Philippines) via UN.org)

Major drainage systems in Accra, Ghana's capital city, empty single-use plastic waste into the ocean through the Korle Lagoon. The urban poor sometimes swim in it to recover recyclable material. (Image: Muntaka Chasant (Ghana) via UN)

Major drainage systems in Accra, Ghana’s capital city, empty single-use plastic waste into the ocean through the Korle Lagoon. The urban poor sometimes swim in it to recover recyclable material. (Image: Muntaka Chasant (Ghana) via UN.org)

These boys spend their days fighting for food and goods. It’s a daily war for them in the depot of Chittagong, Bangladesh. (Image: Muhammad Amdad Hossain (Bangladesh) via UN)

These boys spend their days fighting for food and goods. It’s a daily war for them in the depot of Chittagong, Bangladesh. (Image: Muhammad Amdad Hossain (Bangladesh) via UN.org)

This woman is collecting and separating plastic bottles according to their type, so she can then sell them to recycling factories in Mandi Bahauddin Punjab, Pakistan (Image: Sufyan Arshad (Pakistan) via UN)

This woman is collecting and separating plastic bottles according to their type, so she can then sell them to recycling factories in Mandi Bahauddin, Punjab, Pakistan (Image: Sufyan Arshad (Pakistan) via UN.org)

The Njoro River flows from the Mau Forest, continuing along several residential areas. By the time it reaches Lake Nakuru, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Kenya, it is filled with plastic. (Image: James Wakibia (Kenya) via UN)

The Njoro River flows from the Mau Forest, continuing along several residential areas. By the time it reaches Lake Nakuru, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Kenya, it is filled with plastic. (Image: James Wakibia (Kenya) via UN.org)

A large number of homeless people in Dhaka, Bangladesh have lost their property due to natural disasters. For them, an asphalt street is the best they can hope for, otherwise they have to sleep on plastic trash. (Image: Muhammad Amdad Hossain (Bangladesh) via UN)

A large number of homeless people in Dhaka, Bangladesh, have lost their property due to natural disasters. For them, an asphalt street is the best they can hope for; otherwise, they have to sleep on plastic trash. (Image: Muhammad Amdad Hossain (Bangladesh) via UN.org)

In the archipelago of islands off the coast of Panama, the indigenous communities of the Guna Yala tribe are suffering from a plastic invasion. (Image: Sophie Dingwall (The United Kingdom) via UN)

In the archipelago of islands off the coast of Panama, the indigenous communities of the Guna Yala tribe are suffering from a plastic invasion. (Image: Sophie Dingwall (The United Kingdom) via UN.org)

Once an important commercial waterway, the Buriganga river in the southwest outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, has now turned into a plastic river. (Image: Shahriar Hossain (Bangladesh) via UN)

Once an important commercial waterway, the Buriganga river in the southwest outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh, has now turned into a plastic river. (Image: Shahriar Hossain (Bangladesh) via UN.org)

Aiming to engage young people in the fight against plastic pollution, a Zero Waste classroom in Berkeley, California has managed to generate only a jar of waste (a little less than a litre) during the entire school year. (Image: Jacqueline Elbing-Omania (Germany) via UN)

Aiming to engage young people in the fight against plastic pollution, a Zero Waste classroom in Berkeley, California, has managed to generate only a jar of waste (a little less than a litre) during the entire school year. (Image: Jacqueline Elbing-Omania (Germany) via UN.org)

Trash heaps near the Adriatic Sea where the Bura wind spreads plastic waste onto the grazing fields. (Image: Goran Dorić (Croatia) via UN)

Trash heaps near the Adriatic Sea where the Bura wind spreads plastic waste onto the grazing fields. (Image: Goran Dorić (Croatia) via UN.org)

Fishing in the Brantas river of the East Java province, Indonesia, means going through loads of plastic trash, discarded by the residents of thousands of buildings. (Image: Fully Syafi Handoko (Indonesia) via UN)

Fishing in the Brantas river of the East Java province, Indonesia, means going through loads of plastic trash, discarded by the residents of thousands of buildings. (Image: Fully Syafi Handoko (Indonesia) via UN.org)

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